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New Zealand has coastline on a grand scale. Beaches, bays, harbours and cliff edges add up to a total length of around 18,000 kilometres. You’ll find everything from the tropical prettiness of turquoise water and crystalline sand to the soulful drama of surf exploding against ancient sandstone.


Fourteen National Parks protect New Zealand’s most famous natural assets. All of them offer exceptional outdoor adventures, but each park is highly individual.

Much of Northland's extensive coastline remains unspoilt - an aquatic playground for adventure activities and escapist relaxation. Whangarei and Opua are havens for international and local yachts; Tutukaka and Russell are game fishing hot spots; the beaches of Doubtless Bay are endlessly beautiful.

Southland is lush and green. Tranquil waterways attract fly-fishing enthusiasts in search of brown trout. Near-pristine southern rainforest provides opportunities for day walks and hiking. The amazing Catlins Coast promises wildlife encounters and the chance to see Curio Bay – a petrified forest of subtropical kauri and other trees dating back to the Jurassic age.

Rocky and wild, pristine and shimmering or black with iron ore, you're never far from the coast in New Zealand.

Nature demonstrates her awesome power with grinding glaciers, seemingly bottomless fiords and steaming geothermal hot spots.

Each one different in character, New Zealand's Islands reflect the contrasts of the mainland.

Popular playgrounds or idyllic hideaways, New Zealand's lakes are a drawcard for all.

Slow your pace and give your senses time to take in your surroundings. You can't really appreciate the flavour of a place until you've explored it on foot.

Slow your pace and give your senses time to take in your surroundings. You can't really appreciate the flavour of a place until you've explored it on foot.

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From thrilling bungy jumps to gentle hikes through scenic native bush, New Zealand offers a huge range of outdoor activities. Visit the Official New Zealand Travel Site for more information.

New Zealanders have a unique and dynamic culture, with European, Maori, Pacific and Asian influences. It’s a culture that celebrates the many different lifestyles we live, and the stories we have to tell. Visit our New Zealand History section for more information.

New Zealand has a stunning variety of landforms — from spectacular alpine glaciers and massive mountain ranges to rolling green farmland and long sandy beaches.

With vast open spaces filled with stunning rugged landscapes, gorgeous beaches, often spectacular geothermal and volcanic activity, a temperate climate and fascinating animal and plant life, and it is no surprise that New Zealand’s pure natural environment is so attractive to visitors from other countries. And the great advantage of New Zealand is there are many different landscapes, environments, and ecosystems so close to each other.

New Zealand has abundant and diverse marine life, and whale watching and swimming with dolphins are two of New Zealand’s most highly recommended tourist experiences. The small (up to 1.4m) Hector’s dolphin is the world’s rarest dolphin and only found in New Zealand waters. There are a number of spots in the South Island where you can see Hector’s dolphins close up. Visit the Official New Zealand Travel Site for more information.